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Cartridge Needle Help

learner

Basic
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6 Apr 2020
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Wee
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419
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Male
Going to buy a Round Liner and there are so many tight types.

- Really Fine Tight
- Regular Tight
- Medium Tight
- Extra Tight

[ 1 ] Can anyone explain what each one is used for? And which is the common one to get for a round liner?

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[ 2 ] For Magnum needles which kind is the best for getting shading/color in well and bright on fake skin/real skin. Curved or straight magnums?

[ 3 ] And which taper is the best and what are the difference? Medium taper or long taper?

[ 4 ] Also what are soft edge magnums?
 

MirandM

Premium Gold
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Answer to 3: Have a look at this video
It's about PMU but explains the taper part excellent (from about 2:40 onwards).
 

Cyberthrasher

Premium
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23 Sep 2019
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Allen
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As you're just learning, I'd stick to basics. People have tattooed for over a century with the most basic needles. Everything else just makes it easier to get high end results. But, if you don't have the technique down, those aids aren't going to do you any favors.

The tighter a needle, the smaller the point and tighter the tip of each individual pin is together. A 1205RL (#12 needles in a group of 5) is looser and will make a slightly fatter line than a 1205RL tight. Bugpins are smaller gauge needles, making the tips even closer together and the grouping smaller. A Mag and a Curved mag differ in the layout of the edge. A curved mag isn't flat when contacting the skin, but curved so that the outer edges of the needle grouping are higher up - allowing more of a feathered approach. That's great for grey wash and detailed shading. But guess what. You still need to be proficient in shading before any curved grouping will make it better.

Stick to the basics wherever you can and add the different options later on once you're good with them and need something more that you can't add with more skill (it's cheaper that way anyway).

And, since you're asking about "tight" needle groupings. Tight is an easy way to spell "blowout" if you're not careful.



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