How to react, what to change when skin is cut?

DKJ

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23 Oct 2017
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thetattooyoyo
Hi all,
So yesternight i was tattooing my wife's forearm, real close to the interior of the elbow.

The skin seemed hard and wasn't taking ink.
I was on the same settings and gear than ever before so i thought about taking the volts up.

But the skin seemed still resistant and wasn't taking more ink. Took the volts down to normal and it was like i was forcing the needle in, like piercing it.

i was afraid to cut the skin by overworking it, and yeah it did happen on 3 places.

2 cuts of 1 mm long and large as my needle (7RL).
1 is a hole like the size of the inner hole of a needle.

What should i do ?

I finished it with multiple passes but it's still very light.
Maybe there are ways to soften the skin when it's hard?
I tattooed my cousin and she had the same kind of skin, very hard like elephant skin.
I hope she doesn't read this, lol

I use vaseline, if that matters over anything.
Any tips?

Peace,

DKJ
 

Cas0b

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24 Dec 2020
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Hey, me again! I’m just lurking through the whole forum.

This happened to me not long ago, I finished the tat with multiple passes, I don’t think I scarred the skin but the result is still a bit faint, the ink really DID NOT WANT to go in.

As this post was written a year ago, did this happen to you again, and have you found a way to work it out?

Thank youuuu 😁
 

DKJ

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Salut!

Yeah, i can manage this quite well now, but it's still challenging.

Do know that for this particular tattoo, i did a big mistake which was to come back the day after, so the skin was into the healing process and i damaged it (hence the cutting).

But, the elephant skin has been around on my actual client. Here's how i got the best results:
- asked him to moisturize his skin the days before tattoing,
- sped up my Volts (rotary),
- dipped much often ink,
- stretched like a mofo,
- adjusted my machine angles to be slighly perpendicular to the skin,
- slowed down my hand,
- tried to reposition client to get a natural stretch.

Which area have you been trying to ink?
Some skin areas are really harder than others.

Another question : when you tried, what did your eyes see? Was it like your needle was in the skin but no ink was going in?

Also, it seems to me that some parts of the body are thicker due to old scars (now almost invisible) and also because the'yre in contact with clothes, or else when they're moving often (joints like knees, albows).

Peace,

DKJ
 
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Burt

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24 Apr 2021
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I had a similar experience tattooing my mates foot. We live barefoot so his feet were like leather.... Or elephant skin haha. Exactly like you said dkj looked as though the needle was in at the right depth but not much ink. Healed really light. Went over it couple weeks later with little bit more volts ( rotary too) a tiny tiny bit more depth, made sure always had a little bit vaseline on it and slow hand and went in real nice. Pretty much one pass.
 

DKJ

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I had a similar experience tattooing my mates foot. We live barefoot so his feet were like leather.... Or elephant skin haha. Exactly like you said dkj looked as though the needle was in at the right depth but not much ink. Healed really light. Went over it couple weeks later with little bit more volts ( rotary too) a tiny tiny bit more depth, made sure always had a little bit vaseline on it and slow hand and went in real nice. Pretty much one pass.
One thing to look at too, in this scenario, is that this rough skin may need us to push the needles in, which will suddendly pierce and take a little bit of extra depht, and could and up in a brutal blowout.

Peace,

DKJ
 

Burt

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24 Apr 2021
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One thing to look at too, in this scenario, is that this rough skin may need us to push the needles in, which will suddendly pierce and take a little bit of extra depht, and could and up in a brutal blowout.

Peace,

DKJ
True... Definitely needle a slight pressure. It seemed like the thin layer of vaseline really helped to make that 'piercing' smoother.
I luckily didn't have any blowouts. But can see how that could happen. Like drilling through wood haha
 

DKJ

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you went too hard, there's always going to be a sweet spot and you went past it. No shame in doing multiple passes if it's a really tough spot as well.

this is also why I prefer lining with RS instead.
Could you elaborate on how to find that sweet spot?
Because (if Casa had the same problem) the needle actually goes into the skin, but the ink is not sinking in.
Maybe the vacuum that should be grasping the ink into the skin was too quick to do the job, but going higher in the Volts worked too...

I had the same experience as Burt's, vaseline+more ink dip saved my sessions.

Peace,

DKJ
 

soulstare22

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20 Jan 2019
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https://www.instagram.com/lilcatinkportfolio/
then you need more inkflow, really you have to understand the variables that hit the sweet spot and tune accordingly. Sometimes the viscosity of the ink plays as well, maybe you need to water down the ink a bit so it flows better.

inkflow, voltage, needle hang, skin stretch, stroke length, needle penetrating force, needle depth, there's too many to list, it's pretty complicated.

The easiest way is just to go gently first, and then slowly increase the pressure by increasing voltage, needle penetrating depth, or going slower. These are all variables that contribute to a more saturated line.



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DKJ

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23 Oct 2017
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thetattooyoyo
then you need more inkflow, really you have to understand the variables that hit the sweet spot and tune accordingly. Sometimes the viscosity of the ink plays as well, maybe you need to water down the ink a bit so it flows better.

inkflow, voltage, needle hang, skin stretch, stroke length, needle penetrating force, needle depth, there's too many to list, it's pretty complicated.

The easiest way is just to go gently first, and then slowly increase the pressure by increasing voltage, needle penetrating depth, or going slower. These are all variables that contribute to a more saturated line.
Thanks for all these details,

Peace,


DKJ
 

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