Tattoo Kits

Messages
53
Likes
0
Thread starter #1
I recently purchased a tattoo kit and was just wondering what sort of quality of tattoo i would be able to do with it. I have seen it on a lot of other tattoo forums, to stay away from kits, but why should this be so? :confused:
 

Supertatz

Tattoo Equipment Supplier
Messages
86
Likes
0
Location
Sheffield
First Name
Sarah
#2
Tattoo kits are never as bad as people make out.
OK, they are not as good as professional equipment, but for use on practice skin and pig skin etc, they are great and CHEAP!
You can really get a feel for lines etc, which if you are new to tattooing, why should you buy a couple of very expensive machines, 10 expensive inks, a batch of needles, tips, tubes, grips, power supply etc if you are going to find it 'boring' in a few weeks!

So hopefully my views are clear.
Beginners use kits, then progress to better equipment with experience.
 

sarahkls

Regular Member
Messages
2
Likes
0
Location
north east england
#3
I bought a starter kit but once you know what you need it's easy to add to it i have 3 tattoo guns now loads of medical equipment, and tubes and needles of all sizes if you tune your tattoo machine properly and use good quality ink you can't go far wrong, visit e bay most of the equipmants are cheap and are from proper tattoo suppliers.
 

steve69

Regular Member
Messages
5
Likes
0
Location
Grays Essex
#4
I bought a 2 gun starter kit off ebay for about *£80 , everything you need. Just got some good quality ink,needles and disposable tubes before i started on myself.Its all good in my opinion.
 

stream26

Regular Member
Messages
1
Likes
0
Location
Vancouver
First Name
Olivia
Gender
Female
#5
On my options "Tattoo starter kits" are crap. I've never seen a tattoo machine come from one that is worth using on even a grapefruit. A decent tattoo setup tends to cost upward of 1000$. These are precision tools. Don't waste your money on what are essentially toys.Here good article how correctly make a choice http://tattoo-journal.com/tattoo-kits-and-equipment-how-to-purchase-it-carefully/. Hope it will help you.
 

whippet

Donator
Premium
Messages
346
Likes
486
Location
UK
First Name
Solo
#6
In tattooing the phrase 'buy cheap buy twice' has never been more true. I have learnt this to my own detriment. I have a 'working' collection of 7 machines...but I have another 7 machines that I'd never use on a person and about another 5 that I've already stripped down for spare parts, that in reality will probably sit and rust in their box.

In addition to machines DO NOT be tempted to go cheap with anything that will comes close to the tattoo site or in the flesh. So buy Tubes, Needles and WELL-KNOWN ink from REPUTABLE suppliers. Just cos a bottle has 'Dynamic' on the label, may not mean it's Dynamic...especially if it's from eBay. Most ink manufacturers will list their various national distributors...check em out before spending your money.

Cheap stuff I've bought and still use.....foot switches and clip cords, which break often so always have a few spares to hand.

I think (my opinion only) that you can probably get by with a cheap power supply, some people will disagree (I know). I have a £150 power suppy with a knob control on the front and it's difficult to fully protect when tattooing. So I bought a Chinese Hurricane supply, purely for the ease of applying barrier film and pushing 'protected' buttons on the front. So far this £30 power supply is serving me well running coils and rotaries.

I also used cheap Chinese colour inks when I was practising on pig and fake skins, just to get to grips with packing technique.
 

Last edited:

JP

Donator
Premium
Messages
461
Likes
421
Location
Dubai
First Name
James
#8
Why comment on a post from 2009?
why not? it's still a valid question and it's not like the forum is buzzing with activity these days...

My opinion is kits are a good way to start...Whippet, you are spot on mate 'buy cheap, buy twice' but then again in this industry the same could be said as 'buy expensive, buy 3 or 4 more time' the machine purchases never seem to stop...i'd say if you are looking at being "self taught" a cheap kit is an affordable way to get used to handling machines...same with a lot of stuff, my first car cost less than my most expensive tattoo machine
 
Messages
1,001
Likes
802
Location
Staffordshire
First Name
Andy
Gender
Male
#9
When I was considering restarting a few years back I purchased a kit containing a cheap chinese tattoo machine, a lab power supply which I still use, some disposable tubes and needles and a cheap black ink, only cost about £50 and it sparked my interest again, worked fine on grapefruits and my own legs.
 
Likes: JP
Messages
449
Likes
323
Location
Budapest
First Name
Peter
Gender
Male
#10
I also bought chinese tools when i start.
In my opinion needles most important point. (ink proper viscosity is second)
When i swap the chinese needles to decent quality, my (upgraded) chinese machine is started to working very well with it...
 

Goldwingdaz

Donator
Premium
Messages
1,015
Likes
806
Location
Stoke on Trent
First Name
Daz
Gender
Male
#11
I bought a cheap 1 gun kit to start, then added another cheap'ish machine, but i improved them by simply swapping out caps and a little filing and bending, they now sound good, run consistent, hold well, and are tuned reasonably. They are all basically magnetic devices, any amount of engineering and electrical skill (both in my background) can improve cheap and make it decent. I personally would not spend big money at first, maybe down the line, but not from day one.
 

Dazza

Premium
Messages
488
Likes
376
Location
Perth
First Name
Daryl
Gender
Male
#12
I looked at some cheap kits but thought get something decent and if I doesn't work out at least I could sell and get most of my money back .so l went for a Cheyenne pen and power supply and Cheyenne cartridges but have also brought some EZ carts as they are half the price for twice as many very happy so far and don't have any tuning issues that you get with coils
 
Top