What percent of tattooers line with a shader?

WhippTatts

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24 Sep 2017
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How common is it to line with a shader? Is there a specific style that this would be more common for? I’m wondering if it’s something I should start practicing on myself
 

gadsden1776

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8 Oct 2011
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it's not common at all as far as i know. it doesn't make much sense. a liner generally needs to be faster & hit harder with possibly less time in the skin (duty). a shader will run slower but generally hit softer. that liner could really do some damage as a shader. you could possibly turn down the volts but i don't think that would get you far.

if you were going to have one machine you could get the shader. slow your hand down for lines & sculpt them.

all that said... the early guys used a stick with sharpened points for everything.
 

Dazza

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25 Jul 2016
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I think he means needle configuration rather the machines , but I think it’s quite common,the feed back I hear is that some get better ‘ fatter lines using shader needles
 

gadsden1776

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I think he means needle configuration rather the machines , but I think it’s quite common,the feed back I hear is that some get better ‘ fatter lines using shader needles
ahhhh - yea. that makes more sense.

if that is the case... then

much higher than 12.6889%

I myself am experimenting with this. I've known a good deal many of american & even japanese traditional artists do this (or spread needles using a lighter).

what i am hoping to achieve is that with a grey wash or maybe even opaque grey & a RS then i will get a more subtle line... more of an airbrushed look, if you will.


all that said... the early guys used a stick with sharpened points for everything.
 
Last edited:
23 Sep 2019
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hellhoundkustoms
I wouldn't mess with spreading your needles. It's inconsistent and takes time. They sell "traditional" liners that are just that - open configuration liners. Tighter than a shader, fatter than a liner and able to produce consistent results ;)


Straight out using a shader needle for a liner, you'll want to really watch out for fuzzy lines and you'll never get a sharp point (same with the traditional liner). However, they are used in American Traditional work quite a bit, even though the above traditional needles or a fatter configuration would be a cleaner option. If you're using a 5RL, jump up to a 9RL or an 11RL and get a crisp line out of the deal. The one place I would definitely consider using a shader for my "line" is if I want a soft line or something far off in the distance where a sharp boundary would distract from the piece.



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soulstare22

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20 Jan 2019
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I wouldn't mess with spreading your needles. It's inconsistent and takes time. They sell "traditional" liners that are just that - open configuration liners. Tighter than a shader, fatter than a liner and able to produce consistent results ;)


Straight out using a shader needle for a liner, you'll want to really watch out for fuzzy lines and you'll never get a sharp point (same with the traditional liner). However, they are used in American Traditional work quite a bit, even though the above traditional needles or a fatter configuration would be a cleaner option. If you're using a 5RL, jump up to a 9RL or an 11RL and get a crisp line out of the deal. The one place I would definitely consider using a shader for my "line" is if I want a soft line or something far off in the distance where a sharp boundary would distract from the piece.
I find I get pretty crisp lines using a RS actually...
 
23 Sep 2019
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hellhoundkustoms
I find I get pretty crisp lines using a RS actually...
Well, if they're healing well and staying that way, cool. Bet you they'd be better with a liner. By the very nature of the needle configuration a shader isn't going to be as saturated as a liner, you know, because of all that space between the needles.
 

Chustik

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19 Jun 2020
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As long as you have a fast strong machine to push those RS they dont tend to fuzz that much. Linning with a slow machine creates a lot of fuzz because of over saturation in the skin. But you have to go slower with RS to saturate the skin and not get those tram lines. Dificult to get right.

I've lined with RS with pretty good results using faster machines, but tight RLs will always give a cleaner line. In the end, just use what gives you good results. Soulstare has great succes with them!
 

soulstare22

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20 Jan 2019
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I’ve heard lines done with a shader needle tend to spread quicker over time
I actually read the opposite, that lines done with RL will spread more. tbh both will spread. But shader needles are easier on the skin which might reduce spreading. ime lines that spread the most are the ones with the highest trauma concentration.
 
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